Remember Tomorrow? That Was Yesterday.

Remember Tomorrow?
That Was Yesterday

“Time flies.” How often have we all heard that figure of speech? Has it lost its impact on you? It does on most of us. It may be a good idea to remind ourselves that not only does time fly, but it flies by twice as fast as we think it will, ergo the title of this post. Our futures become our pasts before we can say, “I should have, would have, or could have.”
As we age, we eventually have the epiphany that no one person can do all they want or need to do; life is far too short for that. So what do we do with a day we are so lucky as to have? I have found that the most rewarding tasks are things that we do for fellow humans. I’m not suggesting that we only do things that directly impact others because we need to take care of ourselves too. It’s been said, to be selfless, we first need to act in our self-interest to have the wherewithal to be charitable with our time or money. So do something today that makes you a better person, whatever that means to you. Then touch someone else’s life with this ‘new and improved’ person you’ve become. It doesn’t have to be a big production either, but do it before it’s too late.
One of my life’s biggest regrets may seem trivial, but it disturbs me to this day. My mother—for whatever reason—had never had a Chicago-style Italian beef sandwich during her entire life. When I was a child, she would occasionally talk about wanting to try one. When I was in high school, I worked at an Italian beef/hotdog stand, and I always had the intention of bringing one home to surprise her. Being an absent-minded teenager, I would ever forget to do so. Eventually, I stopped working there, and the years and decades passed, and she’d jokingly bring it up on occasion with the subtle suggestion that she still wanted an Italian beef sandwich. It became a running gag for us and only us. She didn’t share this with anyone else in the family. Fast forward: she passed away a few years ago, and several months later, it hit me that I never took her out to have an Italian beef sandwich. So little effort and time could’ve made that little wish come true for my mom. Yes, she could’ve gotten one herself, but she wanted to do that with me. I can’t articulate how much this haunts me.
So whatever you decide to do today, make it a good thing for yourself and someone else. It can be a big thing or a trivial one. Just make a positive impact. Lest we forget that any tyrant or ignoramus can change the world. It takes a special person to improve it. Think about how much time you have left. Then think again. It’s less than you know. Do something good for yourself and someone else today. It’s one thing you’ll never regret.
Thanks for reading!
Paul
Copyright 2018 Paul Edgewater All Rights Reserved

 

Smiles Make Money!

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When I was a teenager, I worked at a telemarketing company setting up appointments with homeowners for thermal window presentations. We were each given a very small cubical, a phone, a few torn-out pages of the reverse directory phone book, and instructed to call everyone up and down each street until someone said “yes.” One of the very few tools we were provided with was a mirror mounted directly in front of us, so we could see our facial expressions as we spoke with people. Underneath the mirror, there was a small sign that said, “smile and dial,” because people can indeed hear a smile in our voices. Try this with your friends. Speak on the phone with a smile and then without. Have them tell you when you are smiling. Invariably they will guess correctly. Remember, our clients can hear our smiles too!
It’s been said that a smile only has value after you give it away to someone else. That’s not just touchy-feely, tittle-tattle either; there is a plethora of hard, scientific data to back that up with facts.
A 2001 study from Jörn P.W Scharlemann shows that a smile increases trust amongst people by 10%. A 1991 study by Hinsz & Tomhave shows that when you smile, you get reciprocal smiles from 50% of people (pretty good odds!). A 1978 study by Tidd, Kathi L.; Lockard, Joan S., titled the “Monetary significance of the affiliative smile: A case for reciprocal altruism.” showed that service staff earned significantly more than their slack-faced, bovine-like peers. If you’re not sold yet, a 1952 study by Abel & Kruger suggests that smiling people outlived their forlorn friends by an average of 7 years!
The eyes are also powerful communication tools. More than that, our eyes tell people if our smile is genuine or not. A smile that engages only the mouth is forced. A smile that includes the eyes is real. These genuine smiles are called a “Duchenne” smiles, named after a 19th-century neurologist from France who figured all this stuff out. Also, make sure when you smile, that you proudly display your crow’s feet–we all have them! It’ll show the world that you are indeed happy to see them and that you have been smiling for a long, long time!
Let’s begin each day with a big smile, wear it on the way to the bank, and enjoy a longer and happier life.

Stop apologizing

LeaderApololgy

I receive a lot of emails every day. Many are people are soliciting my business, and I don’t mind this at all. What I do mind is how people craft their message. Without knowing it, many people who write email marking campaigns are irritating the very people they are trying to close.

Here are two tips to NOT piss off your prospects.

1st tip: When expressing why we are reaching out to the recipient, it’s best not to use passive language like:

“I wanted to see if you are interested…”

or

“I just wanted to check up to see if you had any questions…”

Do not make apologies for reaching out. Don’t preemptively dismiss your proactivity. You have nothing to defend.
Instead of writing an email that says:

“I just wanted to touch base and see if you were interested in…blah, blah, blah…”

Write this instead:

“Your time is valuable, as is mine. If you are interested in learning more about my offer, let me know. If you have no interest, please let me know that too, and I won’t bother you anymore. We are both too busy to spin our wheels. Thank you and much success.”

Stop apologizing for striving for your success. Frankly, it pisses off people who have their act together. I want to know you are busy and I want you to value your time as much as I value mine. Grow a set and talk to me like an adult and not like a scared child. If I don’t respect you, I’m not giving you my business. Don’t apologize for reaching out to me!

2nd tip: Do NOT put “Re:” in the subject line on your first email. If you think your prospect is stupid, then do this. If you treat your prospect like a 12-year-old, they will act accordingly. When I see “Re:…” in the subject line when I know I never emailed this party, I want just to hit ‘delete,’ but I take the extra step of opening the email, unsubscribing and blocking the sender. How dare you put “Re:..” in the subject line when I didn’t email you first.

I want you to succeed, and the best way to do this is not to piss off your prospect.

Thank you for your interest.

www.PaulEdgewater.com

 

GAME OVER (guess who won?)

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The type of people who win at life, never change:

  • Those of us who are unafraid of not belonging to a group.
  • Those of us who celebrate rugged individualism.
  • Those of us who lead and don’t rule.
  • Those of us who are keenly aware of sowing and reaping.
  • Those of us that set goals.
  • Those of us that have contingency plans, yet rarely need them.
  • Those of us who would rather be on the giving side of charity than the receiving side and make a point to be.
  • Those of us who tithe.
  • Those of us who reject the pretense of anyone who hasn’t walked the walk on which we are embarking.
  • Those of us willing to share our life-learnings with those who are ready to learn.

There is nothing new under the sun and the rules of winning are constant and evergreen. Don’t reinvent the wheels of success; only refine them and improve upon them. Even as they are, they will serve us well.

For more information about winning at life, please visit me at:

www.PaulEdgewater.com
Thank you!

Keep Going!

1My good friend and coach, Dave LaRue, shared a phenomenon with me that is common to many achievers:

“That worked so I well, I stopped doing it!”

At first blush, the statement seems whimsical or quaint, but it’s exceedingly profound. The lesson is consistency. Don’t let your drive to succeed be modulated like the AC/Heat on a thermostat (on and off and on and off, etc.). If something works, keep doing it and don’t stop doing it. Too many of us close the deal, lose some weight, achieve the goal, get the girl (or guy) and then stop doing the things that made us achieve those things. If we want to keep closing deals, keep the weight off, achieve more goals and keep the girl (or guy), we have to keep doing what got us those things in the first place, or they go away. Jim Rohn reminded us years ago, that if we don’t use something, we lose it. Disuse equals loss; every time. Personal development means growth and in order to grow, we can never go back to what we did in the past if it didn’t serve us. But if it worked, by all means, keep doing it and keep finding new ways to improve upon it!
For more information on Dave LaRue and his philosophy, click here:
https://www.thecommaclub.com
For more information on me, click here: http://www.pauledgewater.com

Thanks for reading!

Turn Gate Keepers Into Welcoming Parties

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Here’s a great way to get past the ‘gatekeeper’ at any business when paying them a visit in person.

Assume that the very first person you see when you enter the place of business is either the owner, manager or the one in charge. Even if it’s completely obvious to you that this person may ‘just’ be the receptionist, or an employee, never ask this person if you can “see the owner or manager, etc.” We do this for two reasons:

  1. No matter what they look like, they very well could be the owner, manager, or the one in charge and you’ll be doing a lot of damage to your case for not recognizing that. Even if the person is in overalls and changing a lightbulb, they could be the main contact. If we ask this person something like, “is the owner in?” they will not be happy to have to tell us that they are indeed the owner. Always assume you’re speaking to the key contact and they will appreciate that you made this assumption.
  2. If you really are just speaking to an employee of the key contact, invariably they will get a ‘kick’ that you thought they were the owner or manager, etc. They will respond with something like “I wish” with a big, broad smile. But in the back of their mind, you have created a bond with this person; you thought they were special and they will like you for it. You have recognized this person’s potential for growth and greater things. If this person is a receptionist or a secretary, they will very likely let their guard down for you when it comes time for follow up visits and the like; they won’t be a gatekeeper anymore; they will be a welcoming committee.

Try this the next time you call on a prospect and you’ll see a marked improvement in how you are received at businesses you visit.

Note: this works on the phone too!! When someone picks up the phone, ask: “You’re the owner, right?” You’ll be pleasantly surprised how well this works!

THE MORE THE MERRIER

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Nike reminds us: “Just Do It.” Don’t overthink sales, or how you’re going to approach prospects. The worst thing that’ll happen if you don’t close the deal is that you will learn how to not close the deal and you’ll get it right the next time. A perfect example of this was back in the late 1980s, I was the Chicago sales manager for Metagram America, a long defunct, alphanumeric paging/answering service, which at the time was the cutting edge in communications technology. It was a 24/7 live answering service that would answer your calls with a customized greeting and then send the user, what would today be called a text message, on a device that looked like a beeper. Remember those? All of our sales reps were issued one of these pagers and were tasked to hit the pavement. Many of the reps would sit in the office and spend hours figuring out their strategy for the day before getting in their cars and going on sales calls. At best, they would see about three to four prospects before coming back to the office to complain that they hadn’t closed any sales.

My number one salesman had a different strategy. I hardly ever saw him. The only time he would ever come in the office would be to get more literature and business cards. The rest of his time was spent talking to people about Metagram America. He would talk to hundreds of people every week and he sold more than anyone in the country. He ‘just did it.’ He didn’t over think it. He would strike up casual conversations with people he met at the bus stop, train station, at the grocery store— whenever and wherever he was. He didn’t take the process too seriously and his commissions were seriously large. I’m not suggesting that every company has a product or service that lends itself to this type of approach. I’m aware that some things can’t be closed without a lengthy and involved consultative process. But in all industries, a salesperson can still vacillate too long before getting the ball rolling.

The bottom line with regard to the numbers game is to do the math. There is a very good chance that you will double your sales if you pitch twice as many people. You will triple your sales if you pitch three times as many people and so on. Ask yourself how big of a raise you’d like, set your goals, do the math and hit the pavement. 

GET TO THE POINT

 

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Polonius made reference that brevity is the soul of wit in Hamlet and it’s still true today. I maintain that we are either born with wit, or not. It’s not a teachable skill, but we can learn to be brief and a great book for learning the art of brevity is, How To Get Your Point Across In 30 Seconds Or Less by Milo Frank. I highly recommend it. It’s vital to understand and appreciate how busy prospects are these days. An example I like using to illustrate the importance of brevity today is with TV advertisements. In television’s infancy, commercials could be as long as two minutes. Viewers were so enamored of their TV sets in those days, that even watching commercials was entertaining. It didn’t matter that they were watching a pitch. What mattered was that they were watching anything at all. The 2 minute spot evolved into 30 to 60-second spots which were the norm for decades. Fast forward to the present day. I recently gave a talk to an entrepreneur class at Columbia College and asked the students for a show of hands: “Who has watched a network television commercial in the last 12 months?” Not one student raised their hand. The advertisements young people are noticing (or ignoring) these days are online and when the ads give the viewer the option of skipping the spot in five seconds, almost all the students exercise this option. Does that open your eyes? It did mine. We have to respect our prospect’s time, and we need to get to the point and get to it fast.

When we are communicating on any level-be it with advertising, or calling someone on the phone-we have to be as brief as humanly possible. A good rule of thumb is to communicate what what needs to be said and not what we want to say.

Empathetic Selling

 

3D Character and Umbrella

 

“Empathetic Selling” ©2014 Paul Edgewater All Rights Reserved

empathy |ˈempəθē|

noun

the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.

 

sympathy |ˈsimpəθē|

noun ( pl. -thies)

1 feelings of pity and sorrow for someone else’s misfortune : they had great sympathy for the flood victims.

• ( one’s sympathies) formal expression of such feelings; condolences : all Tony’s friends joined in sending their sympathies to his widow Jean.

 

What we are doing here is empathizing with the consumer not sympathizing.

It has been said that if we can see the world from John Q. Public’s eyes, we can sell John Q. Public what John Q. Public buys.

Everyone likes to get an education, but no one likes to be schooled. When we are selling, we are educating our prospects. If and when they have concern or an objection to our proposal (erroneous or otherwise), it behooves us to educate them gently. Dale Carnegie taught us that “A person convinced against their will, is of the same opinion still.” Tom Hopkins teaches a great method to address this; it’s called the ‘Feel-Felt-Found” system.

If someone raises a concern, immediately agree with them and tell them, “I know how you feel.” Incidentally, you can say this with conviction because they indeed shared their concern with you, ergo you know how they feel. This works because it takes the ‘fight’ out of the prospect. The last thing they expect a salesperson to do is not throw a clever rebuttal back at them. It also shows them that you are listening to them and acknowledging their concern as valid. We then follow up with something akin to, “most folks I speak with have felt the same way.” This lets the prospect know that they are not the only ones with this concern. The last part of this equation is to preface your response with, “But what we have found is…” and here you can list all the reasons why your prospect need not be concerned. Take special note of the word “we” in:

“But what we have found is…”

If you say instead:

“But what I have found is…”

…your prospect will still feel as if they are being schooled. Present your facts as if your are both on the journey of discovery together and that you’re not preaching to them from on high.

If you skip the ‘Feel-Felt-Found’ method and go right into your rebuttal, it’s going to feel like a game of ping-pong to your prospect. They will think you have a ‘canned response’ for everything they say and you’ll lose them. The ‘Feel-Felt-Found method gives you an opportunity to really hear them and give them the best solution for their needs and wants, which is what selling really is all about.

 

Transference of Enthusiasm with Experiential Marketing

©2013 Paul Edgewater All Rights Reserved

You started a company offering a product or service that you believe in strongly; something you knew had alluring features and useful benefits that outweighed its retail cost. The concept of your product or service was so exciting to you that it kept you up nights. You wanted to share it with the world and you couldn’t contain your enthusiasm. You knew that if you could transfer your enthusiasm for your product or service to the marketplace, almost everyone would feel as you do about your offering and gladly purchase it from you.

As Peter Drucker said, “There are only two basic functions in business; Innovation and Marketing”. At this point, you have the innovation part down. Now the marketing part kicks in. How do you do this? What are the best ways to inform and educate potential customers? Will your website, Facebook or Twitter page convey this enthusiasm? Will traditional channels do the trick, i.e. print, radio and TV media? Maybe you can advertise on YouTube? How about signage, such as billboards or other placards? Finally, let’s not forget experiential marketing; high quality, face-to-face interactions with brand ambassadors (at Busy Bee Promotions, we call our BAs ‘BEEs’ or BEE-As). The best approach is to implement as many marketing techniques as your budget allows (that are applicable to your offering) and then measure the results of each. All of the above can communicate enthusiasm, but in this article, we’ll examine experiential marketing, as it’s the most effective way to transfer enthusiasm for your offering to the marketplace.

There is no substitute for face-to-face, human interactions. One enthusiastic person communicating with another person will always have far more impact on the marketplace than any static advertisement, or web presence will ever have. It’s akin to the difference between seeing a band live and seeing a billboard for the band; there is no comparison. When marketing with BAs the trade-off is that the cost-per-interaction is higher than other methods, but the conversion to sales or other opt-ins is so much greater that the curve is in favor of the brand ambassador. Suffice it to say, the key to having a successful transference of enthusiasm with a street team of BAs is to have the right team; a dynamic, vibrant and energetic team that shares the enthusiasm you have for your offering and can effectively communicate that to your marketplace. With every interaction they have, your market penetration will grow exponentially.

For more on the value of word-of-mouth marketing, read the “Face-To-Face Book” by Keller and Fay. I highly recommend it.

The image below is courtesy of: http://www.3sdcmetro.com/2013/02/15/how-to-keep-your-enthusiasm/

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